sabato 16 giugno 2018

"Many people just pretend that they like Can. But they don’t."

Quella vecchia rubrica che una volta si chiamava "Polaroids From The Web" [*]

CAN

● «Maybe rock as we know it will never cycle back in vogue. It could very well get smaller and smaller as its last dinosaurs like Metallica and U2 die off and the genre will exist on the fringes as a mere touchstone that popular artists pay homage to, like when a rapper samples an old jazz song or when Jack White pretends to play the blues. Regardless of what happens to rock in the future, though, it’s actually in a great spot right now, with too many worthwhile acts and splintered subgenres to possibly mention here. While rock may be getting nudged out of the top, its middle is expanding. The more its popularity shrinks, the more it attracts freaks and weirdos—those with something to prove and nothing to gain. The more the traditional rock star career path crumbles, the more it draws in the true, inimitable visionaries making groundbreaking work for the sake of art and not money» - Dan Ozzy su Noisey spara ai pesci nel barile del rock più o meno indie o alternativo: "Rock Is Dead, Thank God".

● "18 New Music Books to Read This Summer" consigliati da Pitchfork, tra cui Ezra Furman alle prese con Transformer di Lou Reed (ho un po' paura, ma garantisce 33&1/3).

● «I want to see a continuation of the music business, and the point I want to drive home is: start young» - ancora a proposito di letture, è uscita l'autobiografia di Seymour Stein Siren Song: tra gli altri, ne parla in un bell'articolo il New Yorker, mentre su Variety c'è un capitolo in anteprima sul primo incontro con Madonna.

● Irmin Schmidt, uno dei fondatori dei CAN, ha pubblicato insieme a Rob Young All Gates Open, "the definitive story of the most influential and revered avant-garde band of the late twentieth century". Trovate una recensione sul New York Times ("Can Was 40 Years Ahead of Its Time. A New Book Helps Us Catch Up") mentre Talkhouse pubblica un bizzarro estratto, una conversazione tra Schmidt e la storica voce di Fall Mark E. Smith.

● "The Good, the Rad, and the Gnarly": una non troppo scientifica ma abbastanza curiosa analisi dell'evoluzione della musica che accompagna i video di skateboard attraverso i decenni, dal punk all'hip-hop.

● Ieri su Rolling Stone il solito articolo sulla fine dei formati fisici della musica ("The End of Owning Music: How CDs and Downloads Died"), mi ha fatto tornare in mente che non avevo segnalato qui l'apologia dei dischetti luccicanti uscita su The Queitus qualche giorno fa: "Perfect Sound For A Little Longer: In Defence Of The CD" (anche se a me sembra non venga troppo approfondito il punto di vista di chi produce musica e inventa modi per arrangiarsi).

● «There a strange relationship between me and the city. If I could speak with Rome I’d tell her, “I owe you my life but please don’t look at me that way”»: la webzine inglese Drowned In Sound intervista i nostri Weird Bloom!



● "Dear Cool Dads and Moms: Stop Bringing Your Young Children To Concerts" (Steve Hyden su Proxx elenca alcune sacrosante ragioni) VS "What Happens When You Take Your Kid To Their First Concert?", la storia di un papà che si fa trascinare dal figlio di sei anni a vedere gli Imagine Dragons dal vivo e ci rimane sotto.

● «We are not releasing this record as a tribute to ourselves: we are not going through the motions. I realised in the practises that we had when we met up again, that sadly we are still vital. The energy was there: I was delighted. Emotional Response are one of the few labels I’d consider giving the time of day to, so when they rang up and asked if I was interested I took it as a sign. I am skint but emotionally am very lucky, I have my soul-mate, I have 2 cracking weans to love and 2 wonderful socialist dogs. I haven’t even got grey hair: no mid-life crisis for me mate, just work to do»: in occasione dell'uscita dell'antologia Trial Cuts curata dalla Emotional Response e della serie di date che faranno di nuovo questa estate, su Louder Than War, una bella intervista ai redivivi Action Painting!, band di Bristol che nei Novanta uscì (un po' a sorpresa, a dire il vero, data l'aggressività di certe chitarre) anche per Sarah Records.



Nessun commento: